Community Emergency Response Team Trailer

The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program educates volunteers about disaster preparedness for the hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. CERT offers a consistent, nationwide approach to volunteer training and organization that professional responders can rely on during disaster situations, allowing them to focus on more complex tasks.

This video is provided by FEMA via the www.ready.gov/CERT website. Please see the usage guidelines here: https://www.fema.gov/photo-video-audio-use-guidelines

 

Unit 6: Fire Safety and the Utility Controls: The CERT Member’s Role (18:29)

This training video covers the basics of fire size up, use of extinguishers and fire safety. Fires are dangerous and can change quickly. As in all CERT operations, the CERT members safety is always the number one priority. Safety measures presented in the video include use of protective gear and the proper equipment to extinguish small fires, working with a buddy and a team, planning for safe entry and exit, maintaining a safe distance and position from a fire and using the P.A.S.S. procedure to operate fire extinguishers.

This video supports the materials presented in the CERT Basic Training course Unit 6: Fire Safety and Utility Controls in the 2019 CERT Training Material. This video is provided by FEMA via the www.ready.gov/CERT website. Please see the usage guidelines here: https://www.fema.gov/photo-video-audio-use-guidelines

Kathleen: Survivor Stories

“I can’t watch my granddaughter burn.” Kathleen evacuated during the #CampFire last year. With wildfire conditions still affecting multiple states today, #BeReady by making your plan: Ready.gov/wildfires

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Should We Brace for Severe Winters Ahead?

You may have missed a few brief mentions of an emerging threat in the mainstream news: The face of the sun has gone mostly blank in the past few years, with an extremely low number of sunspots. There have only been sunspots visible on the the sun for 133 days in the past year

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The 12 Areas of Preparedness: Food

Power outages of several days or longer usually follow disasters. Power outages in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence left approximately 350,000 people without power, which hasn’t been restored at the time this article was written. Having a stock of canned food, dry mixes, and other staples that do not require refrigeration, cooking or special preparation is vital to your family’s survival during the aftermath of a disaster.

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Disaster Preparedness Tips for Your Dog

Floods, storms, wildfires — you can’t prevent extreme weather or disastrous events, but you can take charge of how you respond. These emergency preparedness tips will help keep you and your dog out of harm’s way.

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Emergency Response Technology Improves as Disasters Get Worse

Natural disasters are causing more damage than ever in the past: in 2017, the U.S. experienced 16 “billion-dollar” natural disasters — events causing at least $1 billion in damages — tied with 2011 for the record. On the positive side, in the last decade or so, there have been dramatic improvements in emergency response technology aimed at improving our ability to respond.

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5 Skills Invaluable in a Long-Term Disaster

According to the American Prepper Network, the five main skills needed for a long-term disaster are abilities related to power, water, shelter, food, and basic survival skills. My take on this is very similar, except that I’ve replaced power generation experience with medical experience.

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