The 12 Areas of Preparedness: Food

Power outages of several days or longer usually follow disasters. Power outages in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence left approximately 350,000 people without power, which hasn’t been restored at the time this article was written. Having a stock of canned food, dry mixes, and other staples that do not require refrigeration, cooking or special preparation is vital to your family’s survival during the aftermath of a disaster.

Continue reading

Disaster Preparedness Tips for Your Dog

Floods, storms, wildfires — you can’t prevent extreme weather or disastrous events, but you can take charge of how you respond. These emergency preparedness tips will help keep you and your dog out of harm’s way.

Continue reading

Emergency Response Technology Improves as Disasters Get Worse

Natural disasters are causing more damage than ever in the past: in 2017, the U.S. experienced 16 “billion-dollar” natural disasters — events causing at least $1 billion in damages — tied with 2011 for the record. On the positive side, in the last decade or so, there have been dramatic improvements in emergency response technology aimed at improving our ability to respond.

Continue reading

5 Skills Invaluable in a Long-Term Disaster

According to the American Prepper Network, the five main skills needed for a long-term disaster are abilities related to power, water, shelter, food, and basic survival skills. My take on this is very similar, except that I’ve replaced power generation experience with medical experience.

Continue reading

5 Safety Skills You Should Know

Do you know what to do to stay safe during an disaster? How will you reconnect with your family following a major disaster or emergency? Each year, more and more people are gaining the skills necessary to prepare for and respond to disasters or emergencies through various training programs, classes or modules. Get engaged, Get prepared and Be ready today for what may happen tomorrow.

Continue reading

Knowing How to Save a Life May Save Yours!

 

Knowing How to Save a Life May Save Yours!

For the second week of National Preparedness Month, we thought we would turn our attention to the skills all of us should possess, but only a few do. Knowing how to perform CPR and other emergency first-aid techniques may not only save the life of a loved one but may save your own as well. Taking CPR or first-aid classes as a family is an enjoyable experience that will bring you all closer while learning truly critically skills. There are numerous life-saving techniques you can learn…

Source: Emergency Essentials Blog

Six things to know before a disaster strikes.

In the past 10 years, The United States has officially declared over 1,000 of them. And over the last century, more than 25 million Americans have been affected. And that’s not including disasters declared at the state and local level. And, in the Fall of 2017, alone, three major hurricanes – Harvey, Irma and Maria – were estimated to have impacted 25.8 million Americans. Chances are, one day you’ll be affected. Planning now means you’ll have better control of the situation.

Continue reading

The Get Home Bag

The bug out bag is one of the most talked about bags is one of the most written about bags in the prepper blogosphere; however, the Get-Home Bag (GHB) may be the bag you are most likely to use during a crisis. The Get-Home Bag (GHB) is a survival kit designed to get you home if a catastrophic disaster occurs while you are away. Hopefully you will be able to make it to your vehicle and drive home, even if you must detour, but experience teaches that isn’t always possible. One of the unforgettable images from the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 was large groups of people walking across the Brooklyn Bridge with the dusk and smoke blocking the view of the twin towers. Design your Get-Home Bag (GHB) with the assumption you will need to walk home.

Continue reading

PrepperMed 101: Deadly Dehydration

The Beans, Bullets, bandages, & You Blog has a great article on Dehydration.  Staying hydrated during an emergency situation or disaster is very important.  Therefore, having a ready supply of water is vital to surviving an emergency situation or disaster.

PrepperMed 101: Deadly Dehydration

The Beans, Bullets, bandages, & You Blog has a great article on Dehydration.  Staying hydrated during an emergency situation or disaster is very important.  Therefore, having a ready supply of water is vital to surviving an emergency situation or disaster.

If life were a Mad Maxx movie, death by dehydration would involve deserts and grimy men with lots of beard stubble. Since most of life is not Hollywood, death by dehydration mostly looks like a baby with diarrhea. Or a toddler who’s had a bad fever for several days. Maybe it looks like an adult prostrated with heat who can no longer sweat. Whatever its face, dehydration is a lot more dangerous than mutant biker gangs in the real world.

How can we recognize this problem when its developing, and what should we do about it if there’s no medical professionals around to help? I’m not a physician (and this is not me giving you medical advice), but here’s some of the ideas the medical people have to offer.

Read article on Beans, Bullets, bandages, & You Blog

Message from Secretary Kirstjen M. Nielsen on National Preparedness Month

“Disasters Happen. Prepare Now. Learn How.” That is the theme this September for National Preparedness Month, an opportunity for us to remind our families, friends, and communities to get ready for disasters and emergencies before they strike. Thinking ahead can save lives. So we are working to create a “culture of preparedness” nationwide, which requires all Americans to prioritize preparedness efforts in their daily lives. I urge all of you to take the time to evaluate your preparedness and learn how to protect your family so that if disaster strikes, you are ready.

Continue reading