5 Skills Invaluable in a Long-Term Disaster

 

5 Skills Invaluable in a Long-Term Disaster

According to the American Prepper Network, the five main skills needed for a long-term disaster are abilities related to power, water, shelter, food, and basic survival skills. My take on this is very similar, except that I’ve replaced power generation experience with medical experience. After all, mankind has gone without electricity for a far longer time than we’ve relied upon it. On the other hand, doctors, nurses and others with expertise in keeping people healthy will be in great demand in a survival situation.

These five skills encompass the basics of survival in a long-term disaster situation.

Source: Prepper Broadcasting Network

The Get Home Bag

The bug out bag is one of the most talked about bags is one of the most written about bags in the prepper blogosphere; however, the Get-Home Bag (GHB) may be the bag you are most likely to use during a crisis. The Get-Home Bag (GHB) is a survival kit designed to get you home if a catastrophic disaster occurs while you are away. Hopefully you will be able to make it to your vehicle and drive home, even if you must detour, but experience teaches that isn’t always possible. One of the unforgettable images from the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 was large groups of people walking across the Brooklyn Bridge with the dusk and smoke blocking the view of the twin towers. Design your Get-Home Bag (GHB) with the assumption you will need to walk home.

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PrepperMed 101: Deadly Dehydration

The Beans, Bullets, bandages, & You Blog has a great article on Dehydration.  Staying hydrated during an emergency situation or disaster is very important.  Therefore, having a ready supply of water is vital to surviving an emergency situation or disaster.

PrepperMed 101: Deadly Dehydration

The Beans, Bullets, bandages, & You Blog has a great article on Dehydration.  Staying hydrated during an emergency situation or disaster is very important.  Therefore, having a ready supply of water is vital to surviving an emergency situation or disaster.

If life were a Mad Maxx movie, death by dehydration would involve deserts and grimy men with lots of beard stubble. Since most of life is not Hollywood, death by dehydration mostly looks like a baby with diarrhea. Or a toddler who’s had a bad fever for several days. Maybe it looks like an adult prostrated with heat who can no longer sweat. Whatever its face, dehydration is a lot more dangerous than mutant biker gangs in the real world.

How can we recognize this problem when its developing, and what should we do about it if there’s no medical professionals around to help? I’m not a physician (and this is not me giving you medical advice), but here’s some of the ideas the medical people have to offer.

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